Technology in Archaeology

Proceedings from the SILA Workshop: The study of Technology as a method for gaining insight into social and cultural aspects of Prehistory.

The publication consists of ten papers (see authors and title of papers below) with a focus on how the study of Technology can provide new information about prehistoric societies. The publication is based on a SILA Workshop: The study of Technology as a method for gaining insight into social and cultural aspects of Prehistory, The National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, November 2-4, 2005.

Information about the book: Technology in Archaeology

Proceedings from the SILA Workshop: The study of Technology as a method for gaining insight into social and cultural aspects of Prehistory, The National Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, November 2-4, 2005. Edited by Mikkel Sørensen & Pierre Desrosiers.

PNM, Publications from the National Museum.

Studies in Archaeology & History Vol. 14.

Copenhagen 2008

ISBN 978-87-7602-093-4.

EAN 9788776020934.

The proceedings are funded by:

SILA - The Greenland Research Centre at the National Museum of Denmark

About the Technology in Archaeology publication

The aim of this publication is to stress that cultural, social and cognitive aspects today are important goals and perspectives of technological studies, and that technological studies can contribute vitally to the interpretation of our prehistory.

There is today a strong new trend among a young generation of archaeologists towards using the study of technology. This trend focuses on the understanding of the material process, - and see these processes as logical responses and changes reflecting human behaviour and cognition. Thus, in some ways, this trend is in opposition to former morphological and static studies of artefacts.

The book consists of ten case studies, which employ the study of technology as a primary methodology, and discuss issues and problems concerning the methods, results and perspectives of this methodology. The materials analysed in the studies are made from bone, stone and textiles, while the archaeological contexts are ranging from the Middle Palaeolithic to the Viking age.

This publication is a result of the workshop 'The study of technology as a method for gaining insight into social and cultural aspects of prehistory', held at the National Museum of Denmark, the 3-4th November 2005.

Contents

Foreword. By Mikkel Sørensen & Pierre Desrosiers.
 
Introduction. By Pierre Desrosiers & Mikkel Sørensen. 
 
Stone Age Kids and their Stones. By Lykke Johansen & Dick Stapert.
 
Towards an Integrated Approach to the Study of European Late Middle Pleistocene Lithic Technology. By Farina Sternke.
 
Antler exploitation at Laugerie-Basse: a typo-technological approach of the Magdalenian artefacts from the "abri classique". By Claire Houmard.
 
Technological traditions in the Late Glacial: the relationship between the Hamburgian and the Magdalenian. By Mara-Julia Weber. 
 
Site variability and chaîne opératoire. Describing late Palaeolithic settlement intensity. By Kristoffer Buck Pedersen.
 
Spatial Analysis by Dynamic Technological Classification: a Case Study from the Palaeolithic – Mesolithic transition in Scandinavia. By Mikkel Sørensen. 
 
Redefining the Mesolithic. Technological research in Sandy Flanders (Belgium) and its implication for North-western Europe. By Yves Perdaen, Philippe Crombé & Joris Sergant.
 
Technology of the Heart -  The Chaîne Opératoire concept and six lithic assemblages from the South-Eastern Norwegian Late Mesolithic. By Lotte Eigeland

The Dogma of Immaculate Perception. An experimental study of bifacial arrowheads and a contribution to the discussion on the relationship between personal experience and formalised analysis in experimental archaeology. By Kim Darmark & Jan Apel.
 
Transitions in Craft traditions (TCT) – A theoretical discussion of a research strategy. By Ulla Isabel Zagal-Mach.

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